under the sunlit sky
Katherine. 20. English Language. INFJ. Ravenclaw. Edain.
shieldmaiden
of sherwood

myawfulpersonality:

Having an anxiety disorder is like that moment where your chair almost tips or you miss a step going down the stairs but it never stops

kingofattolia:

my kiNGDOM for a derek hale and sam winchester friendship

dresdencodak:

"Silmarillion Chapter 3: Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor"

"But at the last the gates of Utumno were broken and the halls unroofed, and Melkor took refuge in the uttermost pit. Then Tulkas stood forth as champion of the Valar and wrestled with him, and cast him upon his face; and he was bound with the chain Angainor that Aulë had wrought, and led captive; and the world had peace for a long age"

 Previous Silmarillion entries:
Ainulindalë - The Music of the Ainur
Valaquenta - Account of the Valar and Maiar in according to the lore of the Eldar
The Monsters of Middle-Earth
The Free Peoples of the First Age
Silmarillion Chapter 1 - Of the Beginning of Days
Silmarillion Chapter 2 - Of Aulë and Yavanna

dresdencodak:

"Silmarillion Chapter 3: Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor"

"But at the last the gates of Utumno were broken and the halls unroofed, and Melkor took refuge in the uttermost pit. Then Tulkas stood forth as champion of the Valar and wrestled with him, and cast him upon his face; and he was bound with the chain Angainor that Aulë had wrought, and led captive; and the world had peace for a long age"

 Previous Silmarillion entries:

  1. Ainulindalë - The Music of the Ainur
  2. Valaquenta - Account of the Valar and Maiar in according to the lore of the Eldar
  3. The Monsters of Middle-Earth
  4. The Free Peoples of the First Age
  5. Silmarillion Chapter 1 - Of the Beginning of Days
  6. Silmarillion Chapter 2 - Of Aulë and Yavanna

dresdencodak:

Silmarillion Project Part 2: “Valaquenta - Account of the Valar and Maiar in according to the lore of the Eldar”

Part 1: “Ainulindalë”


The second chapter of The Silmarillion introduces us to the various divine beings (Ainur) who enter Earth (Arda) at its conception: the Valar (a godlike pantheon), the Maiar (lesser spirits) and the Enemy, who at this point is called Melkor.  Although Melkor is mightier than any individual Vala, he is not counted among them, as their mission is to craft and preserve the world, while Melkor is hell-bent on twisting it to his will.

Several Valar are pictured here. They are, from front to back:

  1. Mandos - Judge of the Dead and Master of Doom. He has foreknowledge of everything that will come to pass on Arda until the end times, but will only reveal pieces at Manwë’s order.
  2. Yavanna - Queen of the Earth and Giver of Fruits. She created the Ents to protect the trees from the axes of Orcs and Dwarves.
  3. Aulë - Craftsman of the Earth and husband of Yavanna. He created the Dwarves with Ilúvatar’s (God’s) blessing, who gave them actual life.
  4. Varda - Queen of Stars. Creator of light and the stars (naturally) and also the first to see Melkor for what he truly was.
  5. Manwë - King of the Valar, master of the sky and husband of Varda. He is also the “twin” broth of Melkor, the Enemy.
  6. Ulmo - Lord of Waters and the sole wandering Vala (never taking residence in the the Undying Lands as they do). Ulmo prefers the open oceans and is an eternal friend to Men and Elves, of whose plight he is always keenly aware.

The accompanying illustrations are of the Enemies:

  1. Melkor - First and mightiest of the Ainur. Obsessed with creating life of his own, which he cannot, so he forever strives to corrupt Creation itself and rule over it. The source of all discord and Evil in Arda. Later called Morgoth, “The Great Enemy,” he is the central antagonist of the Silmarillion.
  2. Sauron - A powerful Maia originally in service of Aulë, Sauron was corrupted by Morgoth, ultimately becoming his second-in-command. Master of all shapes and forms, as well as the crafting of objects of power.

Notes: The Valar don’t have permanent incarnations, so I tried to keep many visual details vague and focus on broad themes. Conversely, while Melkor could take on many forms in earlier days, by the time he stole the Silmarils and was known as Morgoth, he was essentially trapped in the form of an imposing Dark Lord, “tall and terrible.” I wanted to emphasize a weary, corporeal form in contrast to the Valar, a form that will become further scarred before the end. Sauron, on the other hand, is less imposing and more of a crafty sorcerer. While he could change into the form of Elves or Men, I doubt that would have been his default in the First Age, when his main job was ruling an island full of werewolves.

Hope you enjoy this one! There are many more to come.

me: *has 10 books to read*
me: *buys 3 more*
me: *ends up reading fanfiction*
do you believe that hufflepuffs are less intelligent than the other houses? why or why not? (not trying to be rude, just genuinely curious :)
fallenholmes

stereoma:

Oh, of course not! I think it’s more about what they value, and what kinds of intelligence you’re talking about. I think Hufflepuff might not have as many students that excel in a traditional classroom setting as other houses, but that doesn’t mean they’re not intelligent. Hufflepuffs strike me as practical people - most of Pottermore’s famous Hufflepuffs are inventors of things that are SUPER useful in everyday life, things that actually help a LOT of people. Inventing the self-soaping dishcloth may not be very glamorous or make you a household name like Merlin, but your invention is going to make a bigger difference in the lives of more people in a very tangible way than Merlin does. I think they probably have more trouble with the theoretical parts of learning magic, the stuff that doesn’t have any obvious real-world application. On the other hand, I think Ravenclaws are naturally quick to pick up theory, and might be able to come up with new ways to think about the concept to help their Hufflepuff friends get it. 

Hufflepuffs are special because they don’t value things that make you popular. Gryffindor is full of courageous heroes, Ravenclaw has the brilliant intellectuals, and Slytherin has the ambitious politicians and businessmen. They’re all very shiny and attractive things. But Hufflepuff values hard work, loyalty, honesty, and justice. They’re by far the most ethical, the most loving, the most virtuous of all the houses, by and large. Being a good person is much more important to them than pretty much anything else. Students who struggle with learning in a classroom setting would probably find support in any house, but Hufflepuff seems the most likely to take a student with less natural talent but more heart. 

I think it’s unfortunate that most Hufflepuff students we encounter through Harry’s eyes come off really slow on the uptake. But look at Tonks, she was a Hufflepuff and became an Auror, and as we find out from Harry’s “career counseling,” you basically need top or next to top grades in almost all of your subjects. Cedric Diggory was also supposed to have been one of the top students of his year. I think Hufflepuff teaches students that they have to work hard to succeed, regardless if that success means you end up at the top of the class or just barely scraping a few OWLs. And both kinds of success are celebrated there. 

I think [Danny] figured it out a long, long, long time ago. And was like “I’M NOT TOUCHING THAT - Keahu Kahuanui [x]

(Source: wigglemore)

loudmouthed:

people that argue with cashiers are the worst kind of people

wordsofdiana:

I can’t wait for Sleepy Hollow to come back you guys.

(Source: kpfun)